FAQs

FAQs

Popular questions

There is no one official address for any location in Ireland and many versions of address exist for each location such as geographic, postal, electoral, or historical. 

There are two different types of address displayed on the Eircode Finder. 

Geographic address: This is an address that describes the physical location of an address point using geographic details such as street / road names, townlands / areas / cities, and county details. 

Postal address: This is the address that is created and assigned by An Post and is what they recommend for the purpose of mail delivery. Postal addresses may include a post town or county that is not part of the geographic address as it is based on the route mail travels to arrive at the location.

Both of these addresses are provided to us by An Post GeoDirectory and we cannot amend or change these addresses unless instructed to do so by them.

We recommend that you carry on using the address you normally use and simply add the Eircode to the end. 
 
The business names shown are based on information received from An Post GeoDirectory. As they update their information and it is passed to us, the changes will be reflected on the Eircode database.

If you are happy that the address for the premises is correct, simply use the Eircode shown for all your business needs, such as stationary or displaying it on your own website.
No government department is making Eircode mandatory, although they may ask you for an Eircode, you are not obligated to provide it. For private organisations, it is up to each organisation to determine how they want to use Eircode – we have no say over how they conduct business. Many overseas companies already insist on using a postcode when ordering online as they have already seen the benefits/efficiencies of using a postcode.
Many retailers and organisations are busy updating their systems to recognise and accept an Eircode. Overtime, you will see more organisations requesting an Eircode and accepting it.
Eircodes are assigned to all active postal address information contained in the data provided to us by An Post GeoDirectory. These postal addresses are captured by An Post and provided to Eircode on a quarterly basis. Once notified of a new postal address it takes approximately one month to assign an Eircode. Please note we cannot assign an Eircode without being notified of the postal address by An Post GeoDirectory.

Ambulance Service now using Eircode FAQ's

If an address and Eircode is given to the call taker, the systems in place will identify the exact location on a map without any need for further information to be given. Without the use of an Eircode, the address on it’s own in many rural locations does not provide enough detail for an exact location to be determined. In these instances, call takers have had to ask callers to give detailed directions from the nearest town or village which takes up valuable time and can be very distressing for a caller who is in an emergency situation. Using the Eircode removes the requirement to ask for directions as the geo co-ordinates in the Eircode database provide all the information needed to direct an ambulance to an exact location.
It is important to provide the correct Eircode for your location. To ensure the Eircode you are using is correct you, or somone you know that has access to the internet, should check the location that it refers to on www.eircode.ie. When you search for an Eircode you will be able to view the location associated with the Eircode on a map to confirm if it is correct. The map allows you to zoom in and out and view the location in satellite mode to assist in verifying the location.

The National Ambulance Service will always take both the address and Eircode and they have systems available to allow validation of the correct location. If there is any ambiguity between the address and the Eircode they will verify the location with the caller in the same way they have always done when taking emergency calls.
The National Ambulance Service integrated Eircode into their Computer Aided Dispatch System (CAD) in February this 2016. They have access to a full Eircode database which includes geo co-ordinates associated with each unique Eircode. There are two areas where Eircode is used to improve the time it takes to find locations when dispatching ambulances.

 The first is in the National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) where call takers can take an Eircode and an address which are then validated in their Computer Aided Dispatch System (CAD). The system is able to pinpoint the exact location using the Eircode and geographic co-ordinates, allowing the dispatcher to direct the Ambulance to the precise location quickly, and importantly without having to ask the caller for detailed directions. This can be particularly significant when identifying rural properties – Eircode enables the rapid identification of exact locations, something which has caused operational and geographical challenges prior to the use of Eircode.

Eircode is also used by the Emergency Call Answering Service (ECAS). ECAS currently answers all emergency calls made to 112 and 999. Their systems have been updated to enable the use of Eircodes and are also connected to the database with the geo co-ordinates. When ECAS verify the address and Eircode of an emergency with a caller, this information can then be passed automatically to the relevant Emergency Service.

If you don’t have your Eircode to hand, the operator will still be able to assist callers in the same way they have done before Eircode was available. The advantage of having your Eircode to hand is faster identification of exact locations, and removing the need to explain directions to a property.

Eircode design

An Eircode is a seven character alpha-numeric code made up of two parts. The first part (a Routing Key) consists of three characters and defines a principal post town span of delivery. The second part (a Unique Identifier) is unique to an address and distinguishes one address from another. A typical Eircode might read A65 F4E2. To avoid confusion, we have not used the letter 'O' in Eircodes, however the number '0' (zero) may be included in the Eircode for your address.
There are seven characters in an Eircode.
Slang names, offensive abbreviations and words have been excluded from the Eircode. Certain characters have been eliminated to avoid visual and verbal confusion.
Having a unique Eircode for every address helps to solve two significant problems associated with addressing in Ireland.  The first is that over 35% of the addresses in Ireland are non-unique i.e. where a property has the same address with a least one other property.  The second is that the address for any given premise can have a number of different forms.  Applying a unique postcode to every address helps to solve these two problems.
The design has allowed for the growth/change of properties usage across the country. In each Routing Key there is plenty of growth capacity which will more than account for the anticipated growth.
The first letter of the Eircode will not be linked to a county or city, (with the exception of Dublin where the Dublin districts codes have been in place for many years) as the Eircode design is not based on county boundaries and is language neutral.
The existing established Dublin Postal Districts 1 to 24 and 6W are being retained in the Routing Key as D01 to D24.  These have been in existence for many years and the public is very familiar with them.
No, Eircodes are not being allocated to PO Box numbers at this time.
Eircode is the national postcode system being launched by the state which will be used and recognised by key public sector bodies and An Post.
All addresses will be assigned an Eircode which is attached to the address rather than the individual and it cannot be changed or personalised. If you move house, you don't take the Eircode with you.
Once assigned an Eircode cannot be changed. Care has been taken to exclude any offensive abbreviations and words, names and slang. If you believe the Eircode for your address is inappropriate, then please refer to our code of practice available at https://www.eircode.ie/docs/default-source/Common/eircode-code-of-practice-v4.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Address information

The business names shown are based on information received from An Post GeoDirectory. As they update their information and it is passed to us, the changes will be reflected on the Eircode database.

There is no one official address for any location in Ireland and many versions of address exist for each location such as geographic, postal, electoral, or historical. 

Properties can have a number of addresses attributed to them by different institutions for different purposes – e.g. postal addresses exist based on mail routes, church records may record an address based on parish boundaries.

Our website displays the geographic and postal address for each location. The Eircode notification letters display only the postal address as this is the address that An Post recommends for the safe and efficient delivery of mail items.
    
Both of these addresses are provided to us by An Post GeoDirectory and we cannot amend or change these addresses unless instructed to do so by them.
We recommend that you carry on using the address you normally use and simply add the Eircode to the end. 
 
There is no one official address for any location in Ireland and many versions of address exist for each location such as geographic, postal, electoral, or historical. 

There are two different types of address displayed on the Eircode Finder. 

Geographic address: This is an address that describes the physical location of an address point using geographic details such as street / road names, townlands / areas / cities, and county details. 

Postal address: This is the address that is created and assigned by An Post and is what they recommend for the purpose of mail delivery. Postal addresses may include a post town or county that is not part of the geographic address as it is based on the route mail travels to arrive at the location.

Both of these addresses are provided to us by An Post GeoDirectory and we cannot amend or change these addresses unless instructed to do so by them.

We recommend that you carry on using the address you normally use and simply add the Eircode to the end. 
 
Addresses aren't changing or being replaced. An Eircode is simply added to the end of an address.
Addresses aren't changing or being replaced. Just add the Eircode onto the end of your existing address
There is no one official address for any location in Ireland and many versions of address exist for each location such as geographic, postal, electoral, or historical. 

Properties can have a number of addresses attributed to them by different institutions for different purposes – e.g. postal addresses exist based on mail routes, church records may record an address based on parish boundaries.

Regardless of the address used the geographic location has not changed and the Eircode pinpoints its exact location on a map. The addresses used to assign Eircodes are postal addresses as provided by An Post GeoDirectory.
 
The same Eircode applies to both the Irish and English version of an address.
Eircode use source data supplied by An Post GeoDirectory Limited, which sources information from Ordnance Survey Ireland, The Placenames Branch (Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht) and the Universal Service Provider for postal services in Ireland, An Post. Based on the information provided, Eircodes are generated, assigned and disseminated to the corresponding postal addresses.

What gets an Eircode

Generally, all postal addresses that currently receive mail will be assigned an Eircode, for example:

Residential addresses;
  • each house on a street;
  • each flat in an apartment block;
  • both units in a duplex unit;
  • each house in rural townland.

Non-residential addresses:
  • office building;
  • factory or warehouse;
  • shop, hotel, bar or any business premises;
  • health centre, hospital or any public building
  • each unit in a shopping centre;
  • each unit in a business park or industrial estate.
Generally, if a halting site has an office that receives mail, the office address will get an Eircode. In the case of a halting site with numbered bays, each bay will receive an Eircode. If a caravan or mobile homes within a bay, move, the Eircode does not belong to the caravan, but to the bay in which it resides.
No, the same Eircode cannot be used twice. If a building is demolished or the use of the building changes (e.g. from a house to an apartment block), the Eircode gets retired. It is highly unlikely that it will be required to be used again as plenty of capacity has been built in for growth.
It is likely that your converted garage is not a separate address point. Therefore the same Eircode as your house will be used for the converted garage.
A non-unique address shares its address with at least one other. Often it can be shared with 20 – 30 addresses, making it hard to distinguish one from another. This can make it difficult for delivering goods/services to these addresses.
Generally, an Eircode will not be assigned to each tenant in a multi-tenancy building as the Eircode relates to the property/building, not to the businesses within the building. Within multi-unit buildings, an Eircode will normally be assigned to each unit, e.g. apartment in residential building; shop-unit in a shopping centre.

Eircode for businesses

All the information regarding the pricing and licensing of Eircode database products can be found here.
An Eircode Provider is an organisation licensed to use Eircode in its products and services. More information about becoming an Eircode Provider can be found here.

Getting an Eircode

You do not need to apply for an Eircode, one has been assigned to each address. You should have received a letter containing the Eircode for your address. If you have not received an Eircode letter you can check the Eircode using the Eircode Finder or email hello@eircode.ie.

Eircodes are assigned to all active postal address information contained in the data provided to us by An Post GeoDirectory. These postal addresses are captured by An Post and provided to Eircode on a quarterly basis. Once notified of a new postal address it takes approximately one month to assign an Eircode. Please note we cannot assign an Eircode without being notified of the postal address by An Post GeoDirectory.  

You should have received the Eircode for your property. In a small number of cases the letter might have been undeliverable (for example, there is no visible letterbox). You can either check the Eircode using the Eircode Finder or email hello@eircode.ie. If you have moved into a brand new building, it is possible that an Eircode has not yet been assigned to your address. When it is, you will receive a letter in the post.
We are unable to re-issue an Eircode letter, you can however, find the Eircode by going to the online Eircode Finder tool. On this tool there is a facility where you can print the Eircode for your address if you would need to.
You can use the Eircode Finder to find or check an Eircode. Or if you are travelling to or writing to a particular address, you can call the individual and ask them.

Eircode Finder

The Eircode Finder is for the public who occasionally need to look up address details.

There could be a number of reasons for this: If you happen to have moved into a brand new building, it is possible that an Eircode has not yet been assigned to your property. When it is, you will receive a letter in the post. The address you inputted may not be an address point. Buildings that do not receive mail are not defined as an address point and therefore will not receive an Eircode.

There is a help section on the Eircode Finder tool that can help to guide you.

The address you inputted may not be a postal address point. Buildings that do not receive mail are not defined as an address point and therefore will not receive an Eircode. If you happen to have moved into a brand new building, it is possible that an Eircode has not yet been assigned to your property. When it is, you will receive a letter in the post. Each quarter, Eircode receives a quarterly update with any new properties. At this time any new entry on the address file is assigned an Eircode and an Eircode letter is sent to the occupier of that address and the details are included on the Eircode Finder. Once Eircode is notified of a new address, it takes one month to assign and Eircode and notify the address occupant of the new Eircode.
It is possible the building you are looking at is an ancillary building and wouldn't have an Eircode associated with it. Or it could be that the building does not have a postal address registered yet. If your Eircode is not shown on the Eircode Finder it is likely it will be in the next release (there is a new release every three months). Once Eircode is notified of a new address, it takes one month to assign and Eircode and notify the address occupant of the new Eircode. At this time the address is also updated on the Eircode Finder.

Using an Eircode

There are many benefits to using an Eircode, such as allowing delivery and service companies to accurately identify addresses so your deliveries get to the right location and making it easier to shop online. It also makes it quicker and easier for medical emergency services to locate addresses.
As Eircode is part of the national infrastructure it is not possible to opt out. Additionally, an Eircode is assigned to an address, rather than an individual. You can choose not to use an Eircode.
The introduction of Eircode will have no effect on door drops (items of mailing with no address). If you receive direct mail from an organisation, you can opt out of their mailing list. This applies whether an Eircode is used or not.
For the general public there is no cost to use an Eircode.
An Post requires the full, correct postal address to attempt delivery of the mail item.
An Post has no plans at this time to make Eircode mandatory.
The Eircode should be placed at the end of your normal address, just below the County. If you are writing to a person in Ireland from overseas, the Eircode should go between the County and Country details.
Eircodes are not mandatory. However, there are many benefits to using an Eircode, such as allowing delivery and service companies to accurately identify addresses so your deliveries get to the right location and making it easier to shop online. It also makes it quicker and easier for medical emergency services to locate addresses. Some private organisations may require an Eircode in the future so if you choose not to use Eircode you may not be able to purchase from/deal with these companies.
No government department is making Eircode mandatory, although they may ask you for an Eircode, you are not obligated to provide it. For private organisations, it is up to each organisation to determine how they want to use Eircode – we have no say over how they conduct business. Many overseas companies already insist on using a postcode when ordering online as they have already seen the benefits/efficiencies of using a postcode.
You should keep the Eircode letter within easy reach so that you can refer to it easily in the future. If you receive any state benefits such as a pension, social welfare or a grant scheme, you do not need to do anything, these services will continue as normal. Overtime, you will begin to see an Eircode being included on mail and you may be asked for an Eircode when arranging delivery of goods and services or when shopping online.
Nothing, some private organisations may require an Eircode in the future so if you choose not to use Eircode you may not be able to purchase/deal with these companies.
For Government organisations it is not planned to be mandatory. If a private organiastion wishes to make it mandatory, it is up to them.
There are many benefits to using an Eircode, such as allowing delivery and service companies to accurately identify addresses so your deliveries get to the right location and making it easier to shop online. It also makes it quicker and easier for medical emergency services to locate addresses.
The National Ambulance Service ​now uses Eircodes with their new dispatch system, providing your Eircode with your address will enable the National Ambulance Service to very quickly identify your exact location. 
The Fire service and An Garda Síochána plan to use Eircodes and may do so as their dispatch systems are upgraded over the coming years.
An Eircode will be used as an addition to the address and not as a replacement, so all emergency services will always ask for the address.
There is no personal data on the Eircode database or Eircode Finder. It does include business names, which in some cases can be the name of an individual, particularly for small businesses or sole traders.

The information shown on the Eircode Finder is based on information received from An Post GeoDirectory.
A postal address list exists already. This information has no personal information.
All organisations who deal with data already have an obligation to comply with data protection obligations. This does not change with the introduction of Eircode.
Eircode will not be linking any personal or sensitive information with the Eircode. Organisations that you have given data to and agreed to share information may add the Eircode to your address field to enable efficiencies in their business. This process is not in any way connected to Eircode and you and your rights with data are protected by law with or without an Eircode.
An Eircode will provide an address and a location for that address. People should only give their Eircode to people or companies that they would be happy to give their address to.
No – The Eircode database only contains addresses – it does not contain people's names.  You should only provide your Eircode to companies and people who you are happy to provide your address to.
The Eircode database does not hold personal information i.e. people's names are not included. The database is a list of all the addresses in Ireland, the associated Eircode and the coordinates.
The Eircode licence will set out strict conditions to safeguard against the illegal use of Eircodes. The use of Eircodes in conjunction with personal data will be subject to data protection legislation.
Many retailers and organisations are busy updating their systems to recognise and accept an Eircode. Overtime, you will see more organisations requesting an Eircode and accepting it.

Miscellaneous

Eircode is the name that has been chosen for the national postcode system in Ireland. Other countries have different naming conventions. In the US they are called 'zip codes', in France 'code postal'  is used, in Germany the abbreviated 'PLZ' is used and in the UK the term 'postcode' is used.
Eircode will not be setting up or endorsing a postcode lottery.
For queries please email us at hello@eircode.ie or submit a query. You can also write to us at:

Block C
Maynooth Business Campus
Maynooth
Co. Kildare
W23 F854.
telecommunications-utilitiesCalling from within Ireland:         0818 300 005
telecommunications-utilities  Calling from outside of Ireland:  +353 1 901 2232